I Am Sexual Chapel

By Jarren Rogers

A special chapel discussing LGBTQ issues will be held tonight at 6 p.m. in Boone Convocation Center.

The idea for this exclusive chapel came about after university chaplain and assistant professor of Christian worship Shawna Gaines spoke with LGBTQ students on campus.

“It came about from conversations with students on campus and how they find their place in the Christian community here,” said Gaines.

University president Dan Boone will open the chapel with a few words of introduction. The chapel will feature junior Dylan Green and the director of Equip Ministries Peter Valk.

Following the service students can gather in the fireside room in CLCS to ask Green or Valk questions.

These conversations about sexuality aren’t so much about the issue at hand but caring for the individuals that are effected.

“It is important that we have this conversation with love, grace and truth. For us at Trevecca, this isn’t just another hot topic issue to be argued and debated. This is about our students who have names and stories. This is about the witness of the Christian community,” said Gaines.

Some students think it is important to have conversations about sexuality because it has become taboo to talk about.

“It is important that we talk about it so that we can understand it better rather than it be some monster that we are afraid of,” said senior Brady Smith.

Other students feel that Trevecca is the perfect place to have these conversations.

“Having a healthy and safe place to talk about these kinds of things eases the awkwardness of discussing this seemingly taboo subject. Sexuality is a very normal and natural thing and it should be talked about it as if it is,” said senior Maddie Clark.

Gaines urges students to continue to have these conversations even after the service.

“I hope more conversations continue as we all seek to be more faithful in our call to follow Jesus and love our neighbor as our self,” said Gaines.

Students advocate for Dream Act in D.C.

By Blake Stewart
Eight Trevecca students and two faculty members attended an annual conference in Washington D.C. last week to meet with lawmakers to advocate for Congress to pass a clean Dream Act.
 
League of United Latin American Citizens or (LULAC) hosts an annual conference for college students called Emerge, a multi-day Latino leadership conference that provides college students with public policy briefings on issues like public health, education and immigration.
 
“None of us have been to the conference before, so this was a new experience for us,” said Sofia Guerrero, president of Futuro.
 

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University’s international recruitment expands to Asia

By: Maria Monteros

For the first time, Trevecca’s admissions team has expanded international student recruitment in Asia.

Maria Petty, international admissions counselor, traveled to Vietnam, Sri Lanka and South Korea earlier last semester in search of prospective students.

As Trevecca’s only international recruiter, Petty visited about 35 schools from five countries. The university had also kept ties with schools in Honduras and India as they returned to invite students for the fourth and third time respectively.

 “The goal is to have quality relationships, obviously with the students, but also with the schools and the counselors,” said Petty. “Just like how you’re not going to send your kid over to someone’s house that you don’t know, you’re not going to send your kid to a country or a school that the counselor doesn’t know.”

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Trevecca will honor MLK Day as official holiday next year

By: Maria Monteros

Effective next school year, Trevecca will observe Martin Luther King (MLK) Day as an official no-class holiday.

Held on the third Monday of January, MLK Day is a federal holiday dedicated to the birth and accomplishments of American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

The president’s cabinet sealed their approval in late January upon discussing next school year’s academic calendar. The decision to approve the holiday came as a proposal that Nicolette Thayer, untraditional events coordinator on SGA, has been working on since October.

 “The timing was coincidental. We’ve been talking and discussing and I had already made the resolve to plead the cabinet,” said Stephen Pusey, university provost. “We just knew that we were working on the calendar for the next year and we had to have it done.”

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Trevecca elections begins this week

By: Joshua Michel

The Trevecca student body this week will elect the five executive positions of the student government.

On the ballot Wednesday through Friday are the positions of president, vice president, chaplain, social life director, and communications director.

ASB is the elected body of student representatives who are charged with everything from managing student activity fees, planning events on campus, and being a liaison between students and administrators.

Each spring, the student body elects the executive council after each candidate delivers a speech in chapel.

Below is a list of candidates and a quick summary of what they had to say Tuesday in chapel.

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Trevecca Civil Rights Trip

By:  Susanna E Taylor
At Martin Luther King Jr’s home, there’s a hole in the front porch from a bombing and the woman giving the tour knew him as her pastor.
She can point out the table where he sat writing speeches and wrestling with God about what to say and do.
Twenty-one Trevecca students will take this tour on spring break next week as part of the Trevecca Civil Rights Tour.
“Being in these places and seeing where history took place has been one of the biggest experiences of my life,” said Matthew Spraker, associate dean of student life and one of the trip leaders.

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Mayor Megan Barry discusses her proposed transit plan earlier this month on campus

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Photo credit by letsmovenashville.org

By Blake Stewart

Some Trevecca students and administrators are supporting a $5.4 billion plan to bring mass transit to Nashville.

University President Dan Boone in September called public transit an issue for the university’s faculty and students in a letter to the editor to The Tennessean.

“The university’s commuter population has continued to grow along with our enrollment numbers. That means more and more of our students are driving to campus every day, navigating crowded streets and interstates to class, with somewhat limited mass transit options,” he wrote.  “Trevecca Nazarene University boasts its largest total enrollment in our 116-year history and is negatively impacted by transit issues.”

In the past five years, the number of commuting students at Trevecca has increased from 335 to 523

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