Monday, November 30

Author: trevechoesonline

Alumni won’t be at Homecoming: Events planned for current students
Alumni, Campus News, Coronavirus, Events

Alumni won’t be at Homecoming: Events planned for current students

By Diana Leyva Jacob Alumni won't be able to come to the hill for homecoming this year.  Instead, campus officials are planning virtual events to attempt to connect with alumni in the midst of a pandemic that makes gatherings like homecoming impossible. “I think for our emotional well-being, it is important to try to capture as much of a sense of normalcy, so that's what we hope to do by sharing these virtual events,” said Michael Johnson, director of alumni and church engagement.  An online kit is available for $25, which includes access to the virtual live stream, a Trevecca mask and t-shirt, candy, and popcorn. Ten dollars from each purchase will go towards the Fund for Trevecca Scholarship. While university officials aren't allowing anyone on campus other tha...
Commuter council to host drive in-movie in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month
Campus News, Events

Commuter council to host drive in-movie in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Graphic provided by SGA. Update: SGA has corrected the later screening to 9 p.m. instead of 10 p.m. By Diana Leyva Jacob Commuter Council is hosting a drive-in movie night tonight at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. in the Tidwell Parking Lot.  The Disney film, “Coco”, in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, will be screened. Refreshments such as Hot Cheetos, Takis, Gansitos, Sponch cookies as well as various flavors of Jarritos will be served.   To comply with social distancing guidelines, the event is being held in one of the biggest parking lots on campus. Students will be required to distance while in their vehicles, to ensure the safety of everyone and also provide an optimum viewing experience. For students who wish to sit outside, there will be 25 spaces reserved. ...
Resident assistants struggle to create community with new procedures
Campus News, Coronavirus

Resident assistants struggle to create community with new procedures

By Lena Gurley Rather than training at a cabin and kayaking with her fellow resident assistants during the annual back to school training sessions, Sydnee Pendergraff had to sit six feet apart from other RAs, wear a mask, and listen to a lecture about new COVID-19 procedures. “It was definitely a bit more extensive than last year’s training,” said Pendergraff, a Johnson Hall RA.   Pendergraff is one of 41 RAs trying to enforce new COVID-19 guidelines in the dorms.  Instead of bringing the residents in her hall together to create a sense of community, she finds herself forced to encourage people to stay six feet apart to protect the community.    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines dictated the process of opening the ...
Students search for places to spend time safely with friends and family
Coronavirus, Features

Students search for places to spend time safely with friends and family

By Carter Adams On the way out the door, Kurtis Poole—a junior majoring in math and worship arts—grabs his phone, wallet, keys, watch, and mask. He racks his brain on a decent spot to meet up with his friends, but it’s not as easy as it once was. “Centennial park usually works because it’s outside, and people are usually separated,” Poole said. There is still a high threat level for COVID-19, and many students are looking for safe places to spend time with their friends and family. Trevecca continues to require students to stay socially distant, and wear masks unless actively eating and drinking or in their own residence. Restrictions still exist on visitors in residence halls and dorms, and students have to find creative solutions that are compliant with guid...
Bridge program helps international students stay connected during pandemic
Campus News, Features

Bridge program helps international students stay connected during pandemic

By Kaylee Franklin For some students, this semester looks different than any other. International students are taking classes at Trevecca from all across the world. Students from Honduras, Trinidad, and Thailand carry the burden.  “A lot of our international students aren’t here on campus, some of them are studying elsewhere. We’ve been working on making sure they feel involved and helping them feel prepared for whatever comes next,’’ said Brodrick Thomas, director of community engagement and reconciliation.  When the university decided to go fully online due to the pandemic starting in mid-March, international students struggled to find a way home. The university went into overdrive and immediately began finding ways to help these students in particular. The university...
Campus News, Coronavirus, Features

Students take up new hobbies to fight boredom

By Jessica Bishop Kerisyn Gilbert, a Trevecca freshman was doing her homework at home and when she finished her assignments, she notably became bored and anxious. She decided to pick up her pencil and sketch. “It really helped calm me down and focus better. I will definitely continue to sketch in the future,” said Gilbert. Many students find themselves with more free time since they moved home and started classes online.  One way to pass the time is by picking up new or forgotten hobbies. Erin Smith, a junior, has picked up baking and cooking in her spare time. “I’ve always enjoyed it, but I’m just chilling and the I’m like, ‘Well, I guess I could bake some muffins instead’ and so I do,” said Smith. One of best ways to find hobbies enjoyable is to remember what you liked as a ch...
Campus News, DACA, Features, Mental Health

Trevecca counseling center works to support DACA students

By: Maria Monteros On every corkboard and poster wall on campus, Sara Hopkins and her team of counselors put up signs on campus inviting DACA and minority students to join their support groups. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients are just as likely to enroll in college as the average American aged 15-32 at 18 percent versus 20 percent, a 2017 study from the Migration Policy Institute indicated. However, only 4 percent end up graduating compared to the 18 percent national average, the study states. In response, the counseling center has begun training counselors to handle multicultural issues. They’ve also partnered with various organizations on campus such as Futuro and the Diversity Council in holding talks and providing the space for these conversations to happen,...
Campus News, DACA

DACA students face pressure of work, grades and the stress of uncertain futures

By: Maria Monteros In high school, Yenin Echeverria joined advanced placement classes, advanced honors and dual enrollment programs— all in preparation for law school. “I was smart like everyone else. I was supposed to go to college like everyone else,” said Echeverria, a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient whose family moved to Boston from Honduras when she was 2-years-old. “I thought I just fit in up until that point.” When Echeverria, applied for college in 2016, the fear of getting deported before finishing her law degree caused Echevarria to change career goals entirely— then came the threat of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids in Tennessee where she and her family now live. “I don’t think many students actually realize what it’s like to wake up...
Campus News, Coronavirus

Students will have the chance to opt out of letter grades this semester

By: Maria Monteros Students will now have the opportunity to use an alternative grading scale that wouldn’t affect their GPA in place of letter grades for each course of their choice. The office of academic records sent an email Thursday to all undergraduate students about their option to file a form if they prefer to be graded satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) for any or all courses 15 days after receiving their final grade. Students can also opt to keep their letter grades, the email stated. The Ad hoc committee--a group of 10 faculty, administrators and Trevecca employees-- voted unanimously this week to offer the option to alleviate the stress of the sudden shift to online classes and COVID-19 pandemic, said Lena Welch, dean of the school of arts and sciences and chair of the A...
Campus News, Coronavirus, DACA

COVID-19 poses new challenges for DACA renewal

By Nayeli Pena Espinoza DACA students were expecting a ruling about whether they can stay in the country from the Supreme Court to be issued between March and June. What they weren’t expecting was for a worldwide pandemic to bring everything to a halt. Recently, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services closed their offices and rescheduled all DACA renewal appointments. For students who need to renew their status, they face the possibility of losing work or being deported. For students who were working part or full time off campus to pay for their tuition, the financial impact has been significant. Alejandra Alegria Garcia, junior psychology major, and her family had to shut down their restaurant. “We are going on two weeks of not selling food,” Garcia said. “We decide...