University denies drug search of two students was racially motivated

By Brooklyn Dance

Trevecca officials on Wednesday released a statement denying allegations that the university racially profiled two African American female students who were required to take drug tests after a resident director claimed to smell marijuana in their room.

“After a briefing of the facts, we are confident the search was not racially motivated and proper protocol was followed. We are fundamentally committed to ensuring that Trevecca is a safe place for all students and desire that no student feels targeted for any reason,” the university stated in a released statement.

Terrence French, who attended Trevecca for four semesters and tweets under the handle @Cirvant, started a thread on Twitter after a female student he said he mentors told him that her resident director woke her in the middle of the night because she smelled marijuana.  According to the Twitter post, she and her roommate, also an African American student, were both required to take drug tests after a search of their room did not turn up any drugs.  The drug tests, according to French’s post on Twitter, were clean.

His post, as of Wednesday night, was retweeted more than 700 times and “liked” more than 900 times and several Twitter users tagged national media outlets as well as the NAACP and the ACLU.

Trevecca tweeted the following statement around 10 p.m. on Tuesday:

“We are aware of this situation. After a briefing of the facts, we are confident the search was not racially motivated. We take any reports of this type seriously with an expectation that all people on our campus will be treated with love and respect.”

There are more than 170 responses to Trevecca’s tweet, with most of them calling for more information or investigation.

University officials said they are not permitted to discuss cases involving students, but on Wednesday released another statement saying, “administration officials are doing a full investigation of this matter and will take steps to ensure that all students are treated with respect and sensitivity.”

French said he is planning to meet with student development officials at Trevecca and wants them to look into their drug screening procedures.

“I think [the University] should look into procedures in which they do these drug screenings, they also need to apologize to the students,” French said in a phone interview.  “The way they handled the situation is wrong.”

On Wednesday, campus officials confirmed they are planning to meet with French on Thursday and said they did not want to publicly comment until they have a chance to meet with him.

Trevecca released the following statement in full on Wednesday:

“After a briefing of the facts, we are confident the search was not racially motivated and proper protocol was followed. We take any reports of this type seriously with an expectation that all people on our campus will be treated with love and respect. We are fundamentally committed to ensuring that Trevecca is a safe place for all students and desire that no student feels targeted for any reason. Trevecca will not publicly discuss details to protect student confidentiality. Administration officials are doing a full investigation of this matter and will take steps to ensure that all students are treated with respect and sensitivity.


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Merger with ENC continues

By Brooklyn Dance

The Trevecca Board of Trustees met Nov. 2 and 3 and voted unanimously to continue the potential merger with Eastern Nazarene College.

The vote was specifically on whether or not to establish a  joint task force, as requested  by ENC.  This is the next step in the merging process.

This is a substantial step in the merge’s 18-month timeline.

University President Dr. Boone said this task force has several responsibilities.

“One is to create a three-year budget plan to bring ENC to sustainability.  The second one is to establish enrollment goals that will demonstrate success,” Boone said.  “[The] third one is to present the funding resources for supporting ENC until the merger could occur.  Fourth would be to gain denominational approval for the merger.”

The Nazarene denomination establishes regions.  ENC and Trevecca are in different regions, therefore the denomination needs to agree that though ENC is in a separate region, it is operating as a legal entity of Trevecca, which is in the Midsouth region.

Boone said the earliest possible date for the merge is June of 2019, because of  the need to secure state accreditations.

Boone today  released the following statement:

“The mission of Christian higher education is a significant part of the work of the kingdom of God. The work of ENC is important to us and we have created a Joint Task Force in an effort to find a way to enhance and continue the mission of ENC. We recognize that the realities before us require the provision of God, the favor of donors and granting authorities, and the success of enrollment efforts.

So we put our shoulder to the task of strengthening this mission while being sensitive to the fiduciary responsibilities of Trevecca and ENC. As stewards, should closure be necessary, we will act in the best interest of the mission of Christian higher education and as stewards of kingdom assets toward this end.”

Classes offered at 10 a.m. next semester to accomodate growth

By Blake Stewart

A new class slot will be available at 10 a.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays next year because of an increase in enrollment.

The 10 a.m. slot has been open for staff meetings and other events on campus, but because the student body continues to grow, administrators made the move to add 10 a.m. classes after the undergraduate enrollment increased 36 percent in the past three years, said Steve Pusey, University Provost.


This change in schedule will not affect the students as much, said Pusey. It will primarily affect faculty as professors and university staff will now have to shift their meetings to later in the afternoon.

[Read more…]

Trevecca leaders to meet with members of the Napier and Chestnut Hill community

by Olivia Kelley

Tomorrow, Trevecca faculty and students will be heading to Napier Community Center to meet with leaders and community members from Napier and Chestnut Hill in what is being called the Trevecca Community Initiative.

The idea for the Initiative came from senior social work major Jessica Kyle after she chose to move off campus to live in the Napier community.

“I originally got the idea in a class that talks a lot about community development and awareness and Trevecca’s own community awareness,” she said. “I was tired of sitting in class and talking about these things. I wanted to get out and talk with some people about it.”

The first part of the day will be a meeting between the leadership teams from Trevecca, Napier, and Chestnut Hill to talk about what needs the community has and what Trevecca can offer, according to Kyle.  [Read more…]

Trevecca students joined thousands to hear president speak

by Bailey Basham and Brooklyn Dance

Michael Perrotti got in line around 11 a.m. He waited, and he waited. He knew it would be another seven hours until the rally for president Donald Trump, but he didn’t mind. He was there to see the president.

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Greg Dawson Named Director of Security

By Brooklyn Dance

Trevecca security will be led by a familiar face starting in January.

Greg Dawson, who currently serves as captain of university security, was recently named director of security. He replaces Norm Robinson, who is retiring this month.

“[Steve] Harris called me up to his office, and we talked about a variety of different things as far as the department goes, how it’s running now, where we see things going as far as hiring,” Dawson said. “We talked a lot about my credentials, my background, the certifications I’ve acquired, my education—things like that.”

[Read more…]

First Generation Graduate Hired as Diversity Coordinator

By Bailey Basham

When Brodrick Thomas was younger, it was his dream to play football at Auburn. For Thomas, however, getting through school wasn’t easy.

“My mom dropped out of junior high school, so she didn’t have any education and didn’t really understand it very much. My dad died when I was in fifth grade, and she had to take on multiple jobs to keep us fed and under shelter. She didn’t have the knowledge to help me, but she was always a strong advocate of education,” said Thomas. “When I first went to college, my mom had no idea of how to help me in any way.”

 

thomasbrodrick

[Read more…]